These people must not like lawyers...

"To apply for the ADVANCED COURSE, a candidate must have a minimum two years of restaurant experience in a service/sales position within seven years of the date the application is submitted. Current employment must be in the restaurant/hospitality or beverage industry;

"To apply for the ADVANCED EXAMINATION, a candidate must have a minimum three years of restaurant experience in a service/sales position within seven years of the date the application is submitted. Current employment must be in the restaurant/hospitality or beverage industry. AND, a candidate must have taken the Advanced Sommelier Course by October 1, 2019.

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  • No worries, I'm happy to engage in a friendly debate ...

    Every master I have spoken with has been extremely energetic (regardless of their workload) to assist.

    That is always going to be true, but have you have enough face time with three of them for those Masters to give a full, complete and unhesitating endorsement for sitting?  Genuinely curious, since three endorsements was required for the old application process.

    I do not see how "service" is limited to a restaurant.

    One of the best definitions of a Master Sommelier I ever heard is that an MS can be dropped into any restaurant in the world and fit seamlessly into the service.  If you are not working in an environment that is forcing you to internalize all of the mechanics of service that are required at the highest level and then to naturally give your guests hospitality on top of that, then I would say that your environment is not preparing you well for the exam.  If you're not at a place where you need to remember that you need to talk to table 51 is gluten free and they've ordered the dish with shoyu in the prep, then talk to table 42 about the fact that the allocated wine they've preordered is OOS (and what you're going to replace it with), then talk gin with table 43, all the while seamlessly clearing plates, filling water glasses, crumbing tables, delivering top notch wine service and doing it with hospitality and grace, I'd say that you're not being well prepared for the rigors of the exam.

    Should this not then be the only judge? Online exam applicable to all those who are certified and take it. Top x percent move on to review by the masters for the course and then repeat for the exam?

    I would say not because it would still leave too many people who, because they are not working the floor on a regular basis, will not pass the service portion of the exam.

    Last point I want to make is regarding the WSET. I am currently enrolled in the WSET3... i commute to 9 hours once a week to the closest place there is a class (Portland). Spoiler alert... no one in this region has completed WSET3 for EXACTLY this reason. The court was a way for those of us in secluded areas to continue to advance but now that cap seems a bit low at the "certified" level.

    I feel like you're equating the opportunity to take the CMS Advanced with the likelihood of someone taking it to pass it.  The Court has been judicious in making the barriers to taking the exams harder as the number of applicants has increased.  Just like theory has become the barrier at the Master level, now you have dual hurdles of theory (test of knowledge) and service (practical floor work) for the Advanced.  They want to make sure that the people who are sitting at the Advanced have the best chance of succeeding, and those who are active on the floor will have the best chance to succeed.

    I understand your frustration and I would feel frustrated too if I was in your position, but with so many people applying, some of these barriers they are putting into place (like the formal service requirements) are likely to be codification of some unofficial rules they've had, but never really formalized.  And if that's the case, wouldn't you rather know what those barriers are so that you have a better chance of making adjustments and getting in?

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