Study Strategies: Part 3

In the final Study Strategies webinar with Chris Tanghe MS and Ashley Hausman MW, they continue the conversation around building a more robust plan for your wine studies. Ashley begins the session off with an in-depth look at the MW Practical (tasting) exam: how to improve your tasting skills, optimize your budget, and write better notes. Chris then provides tips and tactics for developing a smarter approach to the service portion of the CMS exams.

Note: The video can be made full screen by clicking the button to the left of the Vimeo logo.

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  • Hello  

    During the lecture, you made a great point on being ambidextrous with bottles. I understand that this can be a useful skillset with decanting as to not disturb sediment. You also touched on being able to open a bottle of still wine and bubbles with both hands, can you please expand on this skillset and why/when it should be used on the floor or in an exam. Thank you and for the great presentation!

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  • Hello  

    During the lecture, you made a great point on being ambidextrous with bottles. I understand that this can be a useful skillset with decanting as to not disturb sediment. You also touched on being able to open a bottle of still wine and bubbles with both hands, can you please expand on this skillset and why/when it should be used on the floor or in an exam. Thank you and for the great presentation!

Children
  • I totally get it, thanks so much! Haha, he’s definitely known to get a little rambunctious, we hope to see you soon too sir!

  • Troy!

    Hope all is as well as can be in Phoenix and you're keeping Caballero in line Slight smile

    I actually decant holding the bottle with my dominant hand, so I gently rotate the bottle while still in the cradle before decanting because it needs to be facing the other way while I open it also with my dominant hand. Being ambidextrous here would streamline that process for sure, but the rotation can be done with style too.

    The main reason for opening bubbly with both is so that you can do so safely in a crowded restaurant depending on the orientation of the table and scenario. Opening a bottle in a busy lounge area where guests could be standing next to you might require you to open with your non-dominant hand so that you can still face the guest that you are serving. 

    I misspoke if I mentioned opening still wine with either, as I only do this with bubbly, and always open still wine with my dominant hand. This is especially important when working with old corks or other challenging scenarios. 

    Hope to see you in AZ sometime later this year!

    Chris