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How much sugar is in your Vermouth and Bitter?

My friend, and business partner (Consortium Cabernet) Dan Petroski makes his own vermouth through his label Massican. He decided to run some tests on a FOSS machine of the residual sugar levels of many of the popular vermouth and bitters. With his permission I am posting the results as they are quite eye opening to the amount sugar found in many a sommelier's favorite mixer.

All RS is listed in grams per liter

Noilly Prat Extra Dry - 24g/l

Martini & Rossi Extra Dry - 30 g/l

Martini & Rossi Rosso - 155 g/l

Dolin Dry - 29 g/l

Dolin Rouge - 146 g/l

Carpano Bianco - 178 g/l 

Carpano Antica - 194 g/l

Lillet - 98 g/l

Aperol - 263 g/l 

Campari - 253 g/l

 

The Aperol and Campari numbers are the ones that strike me as holy crap!!!  Those numbers mean every bottle is over a quarter sugar given the bottle size. I'd probably be scared to do this test with Chartreuse as my consumption habits would probably decrease if I knew the g/l sugar.

Parents
  • Remember to move your decimal over one place to the left change it to %RS (g/100mL), which makes your 24g/L Noilly Prat Extra Dry 2.4% residual sugar. Doesn't make it less sweet, but the "benchmark" for dry wines is 10g/L or 1%RS... the conversion may give you a better perspective.
Reply
  • Remember to move your decimal over one place to the left change it to %RS (g/100mL), which makes your 24g/L Noilly Prat Extra Dry 2.4% residual sugar. Doesn't make it less sweet, but the "benchmark" for dry wines is 10g/L or 1%RS... the conversion may give you a better perspective.
Children
  • Hi, Alicia. I would be interested to hear more of who or how 10 g/L RS is or became the "benchmark". As that is not a number that I heard or manage my wine production against. Some believe that 3 g/L is the benchmark as that is the level that a consumer can start tasting sweetness on the palate. Just curious, let me know!
  • Well, 1% is the magic number that made Kendall Jackson the epitome of California Chardonnay, at least commercially, for a time. And here at work we use 1% as our magic number, because it's perceptible texturally for most people, but doesn't necessarily present as sweet.

    I didn't mean to imply it was a Court or Guild standard.