If You Read Anything This Week: Wine News 12.30.2016

Using data science for pairings: University of Toronto Professor Gary Bader created an interactive graphic that provides 1,000 wine and cheese pairings. The tool was originally created to visualize gene networks, but Bader’s wife recognized that it could offer much more. By plugging in pairing recommendations, a visual map suggested patterns that informed further pairing ideas. [BBC]

The fate of 2016 trends: PUNCH asks folks from the beverage industry which of the trends that helped define drinking in 2016 should stay and which should go in the year ahead. They consider rosé, low-ABV cocktails, tiki bars, and more. [PUNCH]

Wine resolutions: Also looking ahead to 2017, Food & Wine polls sommeliers, including many from our community, on their wine-related resolutions. Responses indicate that while obscure grapes and regions will remain popular, classics are on the rise as well. [Food & Wine]

American whiskey writers: Robert Simonson says the growing interest in American whiskeys over the past decade has sparked simultaneous growth in the number of writers covering them. Many books have been published in recent years, alongside articles in beverage publications and beyond. Some writers are branching out to other spirits as well. [New York Times]

Classic wines & trust: In light of this year’s ongoing conversation about trust, Andrew Jefford takes on the topic as it pertains to wine. A classic wine, he says, is one that is familiar and trusted to deliver satisfaction. Raw materials, purpose, consistency, and endurance are among the necessary materials. [Decanter]

New acquisitions for Trinchero: Trinchero, the St. Helena maker of Sutter Home and over 40 other brands, has purchased Napa’s Mason Cellars and the Five Rivers Winery in Paso Robles. The second deal includes a 90,000-square-foot winemaking facility and 46 acres of land. [Wine Spectator]

What do you think?

Would you use Bader's app, or a similar tool, to come up with new pairing ideas?

What do you think about the 2016 trends mentioned in PUNCH? Do you agree with the conclusions reached? Are any key trends missing?

What are your wine-related resolutions?

Are there any wine trends you're expecting in 2017?

Have you read any of the whiskey books mentioned in the NYT article? Do you think current whiskey writing is compelling, and that the increased amount of writing is necessary and well received?

Do you agree with Jefford's take on the idea of a classic wine? Are any key elements of a classic missing in his description?

What else have you been reading this week?

  • I resolve to work on my spelling of wines, be more dutiful in transcribing and organizing my tasting and study notes. Drink more out of my favorites zone, especially aged wines (starting to appreciate them more but still drawn to young, fresh, lively)