Wine Chemistry

An in-depth interview with UC Davis Professor of Enology Dr. Andrew Waterhouse on the chemistry of wine.

Dr. Waterhouse's book Understanding Wine Chemistry is recommended for those who want to explore this topic in more depth.

If you want to download the podcast file directly you can subscribe on iTunes or visit www.guildpodcast.com

Or you can listen to an MP3 Version here.

Anonymous
  • Fascinating interview. Understanding the chemistry behind the typical markers of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc makes mechanical harvesting, for example, a far more interesting topic to explore. I wonder if the "don't drink red wine with fish" proponents of the past were drinking iron-rich reds. Thank you for this podcast. I am ordering the book right now!

  • Insightful. Thanks to the both of you for presenting a complex subject in ways that the consumer and wine professional can understand!

  • As a Chemist turned Wine Enthusiast, I compleltely appreciates this Podcast, especially the last few minutes when Dr Waterhouse discusses the wine world’s use of chemistry language! Sommeliers and folks in the wine biz use chemistry terms in ways that drive me a little insane. Take the word, aromatic.  To a chemist, the word has a completely different meaning than in the wine world. During my first official wine course, I couldn’t fathom what my instructor meant by certain grapes are more aromatic than others... I kept thinking Riesling and Torrontes had more ring-type structures such as benzene. After awhile I’ve grown to accept the wine world’s alternate use of “our” chemistry vernacular. 

  • I am glad that you guys all love that book! And I have the privilege to obtain a copy with all of three authors' autograph! As I did my PhD in wine chemistry in Australia under the supervision of Dr. David Jeffery, who is one of the three authors of this book! I knew and literally saw how much effort they have put into this book, a lot of delicate writing, oversea calls and endless of revision. Perhaps, you could also interview my supervisor one day, @ Geoff Kruth? He is definitely an expert on polyfunctional thiols.